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Judy Rodman - All Things Vocal Blog

Tips & insights on the voice from professional vocalist, vocal coach and author of "Power, Path & Performance" vocal training method

Monday, February 16, 2009

Laryngitis scare: How to get your voice back

There's a condition in every singer's life when the scare sets in... it's called "Laryngitis". You feel it coming on... the dreaded bug that causes your vocal cords to swell...you lose your voice... then you get "well" but when you try to sing it's like you can't get it back! AAAAHHHH!!!! What can you do???

Here is my experience with successfully getting the voice back from laryngitis:

First... some things to do while your larynx is red and inflamed:
  • Voice rest (partial or complete)is a very wise. When you must speak, don't whisper, which will cause more dehydration of your vocal cords. Instead, use clear bell-like tones. Better yet, write what you want to say on a pad. Silence is golden.
  • Use a humidifier. If you use a warm one, you can put it right up to your face. If you use a cold air one, you must be careful NOT to aim it at your face or sleep with the door closed (think about how leaving a window open with cold night air would leave you sounding).
  • Drink copious amounts of water and watery drinks such as hot teas like Throat Coat, ginger & lemon tea, the Master Tonic, lemon-honey-ceyenne pepper-in-water, dilute pineapple juice.
Then, after the active infection causing the swelling is gone:
  • Slowly and carefully do some vocal exercises to pump the interstitial fluid out of the tissues. Lip trills, bubbles, siren sounds, easy scales... start in the middle of your range and work outward. As the swelling goes down, the voice comes back, and more vigorous vocalizing and stretching can be used to build back the strength and flexibility of the instrument. Be careful to avoid over-lifting the larynx for high notes.
  • When healing after a bad case of laryngitis, it's common to become "guarded" when using the recently wounded voice. Tension invariably and counterproductively builds as a singer tries to protect the cords. This is why it might be a good idea for you to see a trusted vocal coach in person, because you probably don't even realize the tension you could be holding in neck, shoulders, jaw, etc. If the laryngitis is not from a virus but from mis-use of your voice, a vocal coach is again the right way to go.
  • When you first begin vocalizing after healing, you might find yourself with a feeling of light hoarseness I call "the helium effect". In my experience, AS LONG AS YOU ARE NOT APPLYING TOO MUCH PRESSURE AT YOUR THROAT, this effect goes away after about 3 or 4 days. It's important that this effect not be because you are applying incorrect breath pressure or having your throat channel tight or constricted. NOTE: this "helium effect" is not a feeling of throat strain. It's just that you temporarily lose a bit of your low end.
  • To help you balance breath support and breath control, and to help you open your throat, I recommend "wall work". Stand with your back to the wall, head and heel against the wall. Keeping your chin flexibly level and putting your hands up about chest level so they aren't ribcage anchors, sing an easy song. Squeeze your butt for power so as to cause your chest to expand.
Very important: If your laryngitis does not go away after a reasonable period of time and of proper vocal exercises, see a doctor. Chronic laryngitis can be a sign of cancer or of vocal polyps, nodes, etc. Not something to mess with.

Let me know of your experiences. Did you find something to help/hurt you as you recovered from a case of laryngitis?

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168 Comments :

  • At February 16, 2009 at 12:33 PM , Blogger Melissa Edwards said...

    Thanks, Judy. I haven't been doing much singing as of late, but my voice is my job...so I'll take this advice and use it. No whispering for me. BTW, did a few very gentle scales and sound better already. You're the best

     
  • At February 16, 2009 at 3:23 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Too cool... so glad you found the post helpful; let me know if you have further problems!

     
  • At February 17, 2009 at 1:50 PM , Anonymous James Hubbard M.D. M.P.H. said...

    Great advice Judy.

     
  • At February 19, 2009 at 4:40 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Thank you Dr. Hubbard!

     
  • At January 17, 2010 at 7:06 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy. I'm a singer-songwriter and music therapist. Got a bad sinus infection over a month ago & still have that "light hoarseness" you talk about, as well as some vocal fatigue. I'm having the most trouble getting the middle of my voice back -- prior to getting sick I had a good "mix," where there was no break between head and chest. Now it feels like there's a ton of phlegm right where I need to be singing. I warm up with lip trills and a series of warm-ups that help me achieve a more frontal resonance & avoid pressure on the throat, but can't break through. Is the "mix" ordinarily the last thing to come back? Does this make sense? Will it just take time? Any advice? ENT scoped me & said my cords look fine. Just a little swollen. Thanks so much.

     
  • At January 17, 2010 at 11:31 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Anon... thanks for writing. One thing that concerns me is that your ENT says your cords are swollen... to me that is not a good sign you are practicing correctly. Do take care not to "push through" trying to mend your temporary vocal break.

    And yes, often I find the middle voice to be the last to come back. Your instrument needs to find it's coordination again, but also the phlegm will interfere until it passes on through.

    It does take time; but you can try to speed things up by drinking and eating that which clears the phlegm and gets rid of the cord inflammation (swelling). Don't try to get your full volume back too soon; rest your voice if you feel strain.

    If you wish, you can sign up for my newsletter on my homepage and get a free 5 page report on Vocal Health that could give you some more ideas. Good luck; please let me know how you do!

     
  • At January 18, 2010 at 5:52 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Thanks so much for getting back to me so quickly. I'm pretty frustrated. I will sign up for your newsletter. Also, I just finished a medrol pack of prednisone to get the swelling down in order to sing for a gig, but still having the problem. I don't feel I oversang at the gig (it was only 3 songs) but I guess thought it would be a "miracle cure." Anyway, thanks again!

     
  • At November 10, 2010 at 7:51 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Thanks Judy!
    It is very helpful. I hope it will work for me-I am recovering after laryngitis and I thought it is a bad sign that I can't get my full voice back in 1 day)

    Regards,
    Katerina

     
  • At November 12, 2010 at 5:55 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Katerina...

    So glad this was informational for you! Yes, I've felt that way in the past before I knew this, too. Hope you are completely mended by now:)

     
  • At April 1, 2011 at 10:47 PM , Blogger Jane Doe said...

    I had a clearly viral laryngtis 10 days ago (it was going around and came on suddenly and unrelated to anything I did!). This week I have 4 rehearsals and a concert next weekend and I have no upper range -- and I need it! Some of the concert I can deal with next weekend with little rehearsal, but I need these rehearsals for small group and solos. I have heard that prednisone for the short-term can be an energency measure. If I try that, should I try for all the rehearsals or reserve it for the performance? I normally would NEVER go the drug route, but there are people depending on me and I have to be able to sing!

     
  • At April 1, 2011 at 10:54 PM , Blogger Jane Doe said...

    I once got laryngitis before the dress rehearsal of a show in which I was singing in the lower part of my range (stressing). We had seven shows in a row. After 2 performances, my voice was gone....I would wake up in the morning barely able to speak. Desperate, I searched the web for a strategy! I finally came across someone who recommended (when voice rest is impossible and you have to sing) warming up all day very slowly and almost inaudibly. You start with a single low easy hum, and gradually add a short scale, etc. You never add more until it feels "easy." In the end it worked! Every morning -- no speaking voice even. By showtime that evening, I could sing. It wasn't the best, but it was enough.

     
  • At April 2, 2011 at 6:55 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Jane Doe... thank you so much for sharing your experience. Yes, it's so important to work a healing voice back SLOWLY and carefully. I'm very glad you got your voice back.. hope you are well mended now.

     
  • At April 5, 2011 at 5:18 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Jane... sorry I didn't see your previous question about using prednisone. You are right to only use it for absolute vocal emergencies. However, I would try to cancel anything I possibly could instead of using it. And after you use it for a gig you feel you HAVE to do, count on some vocal rest and some detox diet to get rid of the drug and whatever caused your laryngitis in the first place. Hope this helps.. and that you really are healed by now.

     
  • At April 26, 2011 at 3:16 PM , Anonymous Rachat de credit said...

    Thanks a ton it was a wonderful guide, now to get our voice back is definitely very easy utilizing your information. Kudos

     
  • At August 2, 2011 at 1:54 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy,
    I lost my voice about a month ago and then it came back stronger than ever. However, this past weekend I developed either the flu or a cold with a sore throat and this is impairing my singing. I need to sing by this Sunday, the 7th. Will my voice be healed in 5 days from now? I think the virus is almost gone because my throat doesn't hurt that bad anymore. Thank you!

    -Tom

     
  • At August 2, 2011 at 2:15 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Tom... So sorry to hear you've had vocal trouble. Of course I can't diagnose or give a definitive prognosis, but I can tell you a couple of things that might make a difference: whether or not the viral infection is in your larynx or just the lining of your throat; whether you warm up carefully or too little or vocalize too hard too soon. If you think your infection is gone, you could try some light vocal exercises and see if your voice starts to respond. Steam could be very helpful; the neti pot, there also are throat soothers you could try like lemon/ceyenne/water mix or treatments such as from http://www.superiorvocalhealth.com . My chiropractor has several therapies he uses to get the voice back. Also look at getting my 5 page report on 'vocal health' by signing up for my newsletter from my webpage. Good luck... let me know how you do!

     
  • At September 22, 2011 at 8:28 PM , Anonymous birdbrain said...

    wowsa, i just came in from a late night gig, and my voice is fatigued big time, ive been singing loads lately so it hasnt really had a proper rest, my mid range is real raspy and the power is weak, I have an audition in the morning so I wanted to try find a quick fix just to get me through the audition, and I stumbled upon your site.I cant wait to explore the entire blog,:) fingers crossed I can make it through the audition...

     
  • At September 22, 2011 at 10:59 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Birdbrain... I wish you success on your upcoming gig... hope something I have in here is of help! You might consider subscribing to my newsletter at www.judyrodman.com and getting a free 5 pg report on vocal health. Could be some useful things in there for you.

     
  • At October 18, 2011 at 12:17 PM , Anonymous natasha said...

    thank you for the advice. i have recently got over a laryngitis infection and i am just finishing the antibiotics. my voice is fine to do warm ups and does not strain or hurt but as i am a singer i am paranoid that i am causing damage and would really love to know if its safe to sing again a few weeks after laryngitis. thank you

     
  • At October 19, 2011 at 9:13 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Natasha... yes, really if your voice doesn't hurt when you use it, you should be safe to sing. Just don't sing too hard or two long until you can do so without feeling strain. Warm up and sing a little more each day until your performance.

     
  • At December 2, 2011 at 2:51 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy,
    I lost my voice due to asthma medicine Symbicort. Few weeks after I started using that puff, I sang at a wedding and had to stress low range voice. Within a week, I lost speaking voice completely. I have been on vocal rest for 6 weeks now, but still I cannot sing more than 3 note range. How long will I have to wait till I can sing? Or I will get the singing voice back sooner if I start easy vocal exercises?

     
  • At December 2, 2011 at 11:20 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Anon... so sorry you lost your voice!! As to when you'll get it back... after you get clearance from your physician to start vocal exercises, do them slowly and carefully, noting if your voice seems strained after exercising (do less)... if not, next day do more. If you'd like to schedule a lesson to design a warmup, let me know.

     
  • At January 6, 2012 at 9:19 PM , Anonymous Rose G. said...

    Dear Judy,

    Thank you for this post. I am not a singer but I have viral laryngitis Unfortunately, I was in the process of moving while the laryngitis was coming on and so I continued to push it and whisper (unware how bad it was for my vocal chords.) So far I've had four days of 100% vocal rest and am still awaiting the return of my voice. My question for you and any others who have read this post would be: how long did it take you to regain your use of your voice? Once it returns, are there tips a non-singer might benefit from to ease back into speaking? Thanks!

     
  • At January 7, 2012 at 7:40 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Rose...
    As to when you might get your voice back after pushing a voice that has laryngitis: Before I knew the tips in this article, it would take me about three weeks; which for a professional singer, disastrous for my business. Now I know that, once the infection is truly gone, I can use careful vocal exercise to tone up my vocal cords and shorten the 'getting it back' time considerably.

    Tips for the speaking voice recovery... Don't push: instead, 'pull' your voice out in bell-like speaking tones, not breathy ones. Limit your speaking time at first... gradually build up your stamina. Keep drinking the water and steaming your throat. See a doctor if hoarseness persists. Let me know how you do!

     
  • At January 12, 2012 at 5:09 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    hi am not a professionell singer or anything but love to sing round the house lol. i have not had a voice for 6 weeks now had medicenes,anti-biotics, soothers you name it ive had it . am just gettting reallly worried now.. n wonder if i will ever get my voice back. its reallly knocking my confidence

     
  • At January 13, 2012 at 5:28 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Anonymous... I'm sorry you're having this long bout with laryngitis!

    As I wrote in this article, if the infection is gone, you can then start to LIGHTLY and carefully warm up your voice. It's important not to push your voice at all... just use it a little more every day. Don't force it; if it continues, check with a doctor to eliminate anything else that might be going on. You might even try a vocal lesson to ease yourself back into singing. Good luck!

     
  • At January 16, 2012 at 3:46 AM , Anonymous Rebekah said...

    Hi Judy,

    I got a case of Viral Laryngitis, I am normally a soprano but when humming to vocalize im strugglging to get to c above middle c. I've been steming drinking lots of water (with honey and lemon) I have had a lot of mucus. Just worried that those notes will never come back also when i hum it breaks a bit so ive stopped for now cords are probably still swollen. I have auditions for Uni coming up soon and a producition of Sweeney Todd

    thanks

     
  • At January 16, 2012 at 3:33 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Rebekah... I know it's so scary when you lose your voice for any length of time, much scarier when you have things coming up for which you need to sing.

    Try not to worry and just be patient and careful as you try building up your voice again. Yes, a break where you didn't have one is evidence of vocal cords being either swollen or unconditioned. If you're pretty sure the infection is gone, try warming up for longer periods every day. You may experience a light hoarseness (I call it the 'helium' effect) but you should not experience your voice actually hurting. Just a loss of your bottom end until your exercising cords are reconditioned. This process could take about a week... again, gradually increasing singing time.

    If in doubt... get checked out by a medical professional.

    Your voice really should come back fine.. just DO NOT push your voice hard or become impatient with its progress. Keep working it out, carefully and wisely.
    If you have access to a good vocal coach, now would be the time to schedule a lesson.
    Good luck with your audition!

     
  • At April 20, 2012 at 6:40 PM , Blogger Megan said...

    Dear Judy,
    This all seems really really helpful, and I'm hoping you can help me too... Im singing at Carnegie Hall VERY soon and just can't seem to hit the high notes I once could.
    I'm a second year teacher, and i know that talking over kids is usually a pretty solid reason why a teacher would lose her voice, but I do know how to speak and breathe properly because of my musical training background. I had laryngitis last year, but it wasn't terrible. This year, I've been sick constantly, and I haven't really had a voice since December. Then, about a month ago, I got another real bought of laryngitis, and had zero voice. I was so careful... I didn't even whisper! I sat out of my rehearsals and took a break from all classroom singing. Then last week I went on an antibiotic because I got an awful case of strep throat!! Now though, my voice is back more then it has been in a long time, but when I get into my upper register, my voice cracks, and no matter how much breathe support I have, I can barely croak out a note, and it's not pretty. It feels like the air just isn't vibrating the chords or something... I have absolutely no idea if that's medically accurate, but it leaves me kind of hoarse and with a headache. I'm worried I'll never get my high notes back again, and it's been SO long since I've been able to sing them... HELP! Please!!

    Thank you! -Megan

     
  • At April 20, 2012 at 6:40 PM , Blogger Megan said...

    Dear Judy,
    This all seems really really helpful, and I'm hoping you can help me too... Im singing at Carnegie Hall VERY soon and just can't seem to hit the high notes I once could.
    I'm a second year teacher, and i know that talking over kids is usually a pretty solid reason why a teacher would lose her voice, but I do know how to speak and breathe properly because of my musical training background. I had laryngitis last year, but it wasn't terrible. This year, I've been sick constantly, and I haven't really had a voice since December. Then, about a month ago, I got another real bought of laryngitis, and had zero voice. I was so careful... I didn't even whisper! I sat out of my rehearsals and took a break from all classroom singing. Then last week I went on an antibiotic because I got an awful case of strep throat!! Now though, my voice is back more then it has been in a long time, but when I get into my upper register, my voice cracks, and no matter how much breathe support I have, I can barely croak out a note, and it's not pretty. It feels like the air just isn't vibrating the chords or something... I have absolutely no idea if that's medically accurate, but it leaves me kind of hoarse and with a headache. I'm worried I'll never get my high notes back again, and it's been SO long since I've been able to sing them... HELP! Please!!

    Thank you! -Megan

     
  • At April 20, 2012 at 7:16 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Megan... so sorry you're having vocal trouble; I know how bad that makes a good singer feel.

    If you can't get into your head voice it generally means your cords are swollen or you actually have some degree of damage (usually quite reversable with correct re-training). If you haven't had your vocal cords 'scoped' since your trouble, I would strongly recommend finding a medical voice clinic and making an appointment to discover what's going on. It could also be something more hidden, like http://www.webmd.com/heartburn-gerd/laryngopharyngeal-reflux-silent-reflux.

    It could also be excess mucous causing the problem.

    You need to get to the bottom of your frequent illness problem and find out what is compromising your immune system. For this I usually recommend a natural health practitioner.

    Then some remedial vocal lessons could be your ticket back to full voice. I wish you the very best... let me know if I can serve you further.

     
  • At July 20, 2012 at 2:54 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy, i'm a student at a Performing Arts school & I developed nodules last summer. over the course of the year my voice has very much improved & i was able to sing as high as soprano 1 notes. This summer i lost my voice & wanted to know what to do when losing my voice that'll prevent me from developing nodules again. Please & thanks.

     
  • At July 20, 2012 at 6:11 PM , Blogger Becky Mallery said...

    Hi Judy,

    Thanks so much for your informative post about getting your voice back after laryngitis. I have had a horrible bug with laryngitis for the last 5 weeks. My doctor is aware of it and said it can sometimes last for 6 weeks, but will look at ENT refferal if not. On the positive side I think it is slowly starting to come back today however, when I gently try and sing a few notes it breaks abit (And also when talking - still sounds abit croaky). I guess this is normal after several weeks of laryngitis!? I think I just need to be patient - just scary when you love singing and you can't! I will try all the tips you mentioned. Thanks again. Becky

     
  • At July 20, 2012 at 7:54 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    You are so welcome, Becky, I appreciate your comment! And yes, it does take time so do be patient and careful and positive. I know how terrible it feels to be a singer who can't! I had to learn to get my own back, which now helps me help others. Keep in touch and let me know how you do.

     
  • At July 20, 2012 at 7:59 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear anonymous..

    I hope this blogpost gives you some preventative tips so you never develop vocal nodules again. It's all the more important for you to 1. not prematurely work your voice and stress it when it's still swollen and 2. work your voice very carefully, consistently and patiently when it is ready.

    If I were you, I would take lessons with an intuitive vocal coach who has successfully worked with damaged voices. Good luck!

     
  • At July 20, 2012 at 8:56 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Judy--I'm a singer and am performing in a NYC showcase on Sunday. I woke up yesterday with barely any voice and a sore throat. Since I desperately need my voice in great shape for my performance, I went to my doctor and got prednisone steroids to take for the next 3 days. The doctor said my throat was red and I may have strep, but no way of knowing until the results come in tomorrow. Do you know how fast prednisone works, and if it will heal my voice quickly? Any other suggestions? I'm vocal resting completely as much as I can

     
  • At July 21, 2012 at 4:43 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Anonymous:your steroids should help pretty quickly with inflammation of your vocal cords. When you can, carefully warm your voice up. If it hurts to do a vocal warmup, CANCEL your performance.

    You should know that if you do sing on Sunday, you will probably strain your voice to some degree, so plan on voice rest also AFTER your performance and a slow path to full recovery from this bout of laryngitis.

    I'm so sorry you're having this trouble... best wishes the weekend goes well!

     
  • At July 21, 2012 at 6:07 AM , Blogger Becky Mallery said...

    Thanks Judy! I really appreciate your comment too! great to be in touch. I will be careful, patient and positive :). I do need to clear my throat sometimes (had tracheitis at same time - joy!) but the pain in my throaat has just about gone now so I guess it is safe to start off gradually even if abit croaky? just doing a few scales here and there at the moment - taking VERY slowly. Wish I had found your post a few weeks ago - may have not been silent enough (i did try and managed somewhat ;o) I'm a talkative soul. However, from now I'm drinking LOTS of water, honey and lemon teas and all you suggested. Its great to hear from someone who experienced the same and got their voice back/singing and now helping others - I feel less scared now! thought it wasn't going to come back properly.

     
  • At September 21, 2012 at 9:45 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi

    I have got a really bad viral Laryngitis. I have been really sick as well and I am coughing lots with phlegm etc. I know coughing does not help but it has been impossible not to cough. I have not voice at all and a week later it is still the same. I am starting to feel better in myself but it still feels like a big lump in my throat, so I presume my larynx is still swollen. Do I just need to continue drinking lots of water etc?

     
  • At September 21, 2012 at 11:28 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Anonymous... So sorry you've had a bad bout with laryngitis! I am, again, not a doctor, but from my personal experience sometimes active swelling persists after other respiratory symptoms are gone. I've gone as long as three weeks before my voice felt back to normal.

    You don't want to push your voice!! That can turn three wks into three months (or even more) of vocal dysfunction.
    What I would suggest is to do the things I talk about in this article, which should cut your full recovery time. If it doesn't, it's time to make an appt with a doctor who can scope your cords.

    Good luck!Please let me know how you do..

     
  • At September 22, 2012 at 10:35 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I went to the doctor yesterday apparently after three visits to the doctor I now have an infected larynx. I am starting to feel better today so hope I am on the home run now

     
  • At September 23, 2012 at 10:07 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Good to know you're getting better!

     
  • At September 24, 2012 at 2:26 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I have a very croaky voice now but it is gradually getting better.. thanks for the site it helped me so much when I was getting really desperate

     
  • At September 24, 2012 at 3:30 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    And that makes my day!! Thanks much for taking the time to write.

     
  • At October 3, 2012 at 7:52 PM , Blogger Heather Ferreira said...

    Thank you so much, Judy, for your kind comments back to us. I, too, have been hit by viral laryngitis. I direct movies and have to be on location in two days, and have been panicking that my voice won't follow me there. Imagine directing actors and crew with no voice! Terrified!

    I went to the hospital tonight and was prescribed prednisone pills, which I just took as directed. I hope my voice returns as soon as the doc said it would - she claims it should be back tomorrow! If this turns out to be true, I'll be back here shortly to tell everyone the good news!

    Thank you so much for taking the time to teach us proper vocal cord care here on your blog, and for easing our fears (at least mine) about laryngitis! How scary and horrible this is!

     
  • At October 4, 2012 at 4:45 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Heather... so happy to meet you! Hope your voice is better today. While you are directing your actors and crew, I would caution you to be careful not to push your speaking voice! Hopefully you have a mic or megaphone! Best to talk in a clear, bell-like tone with no vocal fry. Re-injuring already compromised, healing vocal cords can greatly increase your vocal recovery time.

    Please do report in on your progress... and thanks so much for the encouragement to me about this blog. Take care!

     
  • At October 4, 2012 at 4:52 PM , Blogger Becky Mallery said...

    Hi Judy! i hope you are well. I just wanted to send an update. I have just about got my singing voice back in the last week :). its been a long time coming (about 4 months!) but it was so lovely to just sing along to my favourite music just now. Your tips really helped, but so did a doctor on the ball - turns out reflux was affecting my voice! now on medication and its back :). I have got a cold at the moment, but even though I had a very sore throat tuesday and a slight moment of loosing it slightly, it came back with in minutes and its so much better now. i'm taking it really slowly and not signing too much! but going to start back. I think one thing I have now is slight nervousness to sing even though i'm making a good sound - just need to build it up gradually i guess :). Best wishes, Becky

     
  • At October 4, 2012 at 4:53 PM , Blogger Becky Mallery said...

    not sure my update just got to you :)? if it didn't do let me know and I'll send again. wanted to check in. Best wishes, Becky

     
  • At October 4, 2012 at 7:07 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    So cool to hear you are getting your voice back, Becky! As to being a bit nervous, that's a good thing if it keeps you from pushing your voice or working it too long too fast. It's a bad thing if you start the counterproductive, tension building 'guarding' that I refer to in this article.If you need help, take a couple of vocal lessons with someone you trust. Keep us updated on your progress!

     
  • At November 6, 2012 at 3:27 AM , Anonymous Rory said...

    Hi Judy. I developed a cough back at the end of August and had an important gig which I sang through, I didn't want to let anyone down. After the gig I was sore and gave singing a rest, but the cough persisted, it was stopping me sleep. In the U.K our personal doctors don't work weekends but I had to see someone quick so saw an emergency Dr, who insisted I just had a cough and phlegm build up which would break down naturally. Well this didn't happen. I eventually saw my own Dr, she believed the phlegm was producing so much because of an infection down the throat, i've had glandular fever in my time and couldn't feel any pain in my throat but knew myself something was wrong. So by attacking the infection the phlegm build up would stop, my Dr put me on antibiotics....The problem I find myself in is that I know I can hit the high notes (I am a rock singer btw) but after about 5-10mins it breaks down and becomes raspy, but give it a minute rest I can belt it out again, then a few minutes later it breaks again. I have lost the consistency I had before, the power, the longevity, I am used to singing for 2hrs+ at gigs and was doing it regularly without trouble...The antibiotics worked, after a week rest and finished subscription, I went back to practice, it worked fine, a little out of practice but better than it had been for weeks. The cough is gone but I keep getting this phlegm build up when I sing, which really doesn't help. I thought I was past this but my voice just isn't what it used to be. I am convinced it's something to do with the build up of rubbish in my throat because as I clear it I am ok again, at least until phlegm builds up again. FYI I play a lot of team sport and worried that shouting during this hasn't helped, also exercising in sport causes this excess phlegm which makes me cough it up - have I pulled something that I just haven't given enough time to heal or do I have an infection that hasn't been properly dealt with? Just to be clear my throat doesn't hurt. My Dr has also suggested an inhaler if the problem isn't rectified. Thanks for any advise.

     
  • At November 6, 2012 at 3:28 AM , Anonymous Rory said...

    Hi Judy. I developed a cough back at the end of August and had an important gig which I sang through, I didn't want to let anyone down. After the gig I was sore and gave singing a rest, but the cough persisted, it was stopping me sleep. In the U.K our personal doctors don't work weekends but I had to see someone quick so saw an emergency Dr, who insisted I just had a cough and phlegm build up which would break down naturally. Well this didn't happen. I eventually saw my own Dr, she believed the phlegm was producing so much because of an infection down the throat, i've had glandular fever in my time and couldn't feel any pain in my throat but knew myself something was wrong. So by attacking the infection the phlegm build up would stop, my Dr put me on antibiotics....The problem I find myself in is that I know I can hit the high notes (I am a rock singer btw) but after about 5-10mins it breaks down and becomes raspy, but give it a minute rest I can belt it out again, then a few minutes later it breaks again. I have lost the consistency I had before, the power, the longevity, I am used to singing for 2hrs+ at gigs and was doing it regularly without trouble...The antibiotics worked, after a week rest and finished subscription, I went back to practice, it worked fine, a little out of practice but better than it had been for weeks. The cough is gone but I keep getting this phlegm build up when I sing, which really doesn't help. I thought I was past this but my voice just isn't what it used to be. I am convinced it's something to do with the build up of rubbish in my throat because as I clear it I am ok again, at least until phlegm builds up again. FYI I play a lot of team sport and worried that shouting during this hasn't helped, also exercising in sport causes this excess phlegm which makes me cough it up - have I pulled something that I just haven't given enough time to heal or do I have an infection that hasn't been properly dealt with? Just to be clear my throat doesn't hurt. My Dr has also suggested an inhaler if the problem isn't rectified. Thanks for any advise.

     
  • At November 6, 2012 at 10:07 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Rory…
    Thank you for your message. First of all, you must understand I am not a doctor, and can only guess at what you are dealing with. I do know it’s frustrating not to be able to get your full voice back, but sometimes it really does take time. My thoughts for you:

    1. Get another doc appointment to get a medical opinion as to whether the infection has completely cleared up. You really need to do this. If your antibiotics didn’t deal with it, you could be dealing with a growing and stronger infection.
    2. Lots of times excessive phlegm has allergic causes. You may need to do some detective work and figure out if and what you are allergic to. Then avoid it!! You may be one of those people who do well with the Neti Pot nasal wash. If your outdoor sports activity gets you in touch with your allergens, you'll have to deal with that. May be some decisions you need to make about what's important here.
    3. Make sure you are hydrated enough. More water may thin out your mucous for best workings of your vocal cords. They do need a mucous covering, but as you know, if it’s too thick it interferes with their vibration. Diluted pineapple juice really may help you as well.
    4. Whatever you do, don’t strain your cords. Warm them up gently and with perfect form when you do your vocalizes. I recommend NOT pushing your voice. Even in rock; Jamie Vendera (a rock coach) suggests something he calls the ‘inhalation sensation’ when you sing your most powerful notes. I call it pulling your voice instead of pushing.

    Good luck, be patient in your recovery, and let me know if you’d like a lesson by Skype.
    Judy

     
  • At November 14, 2012 at 6:33 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I had a sore throat. And flu for about 6 weeks. I still have a cough there but everytime I sing a song I cant really talk for 5 minutes after singing my voice doesn't seem to be back to normal. Singing is my career and I really don't no what to do? Will these exercises work?

     
  • At November 14, 2012 at 10:58 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Anonymous...

    I would wait to really challenge your voice until your coughing has stopped. When you do cough, do so with as little force as possible.

    The exercises then should help; you might also consider a vocal lesson to get it all back. I know how it feels to sing for a living and have throat trouble... not fun and scary to boot. Take care!

     
  • At November 16, 2012 at 12:01 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    HI, I just found your site and I'm really worried! I have a major audition tomorrow that I definitely can't back out of. Today and yesterday I stayed home and have barely talked. All of yesterday and the day before I could only talk in a quiet low raspy voice. Today I have been off and on; there are moments where I can talk a little and moments where it's as bad as before. Sorry for the essay but I just wanted to know what I could do to be able to sing for tomorrow. After that I will be able to get a nice long rest. Thank you so much!

     
  • At November 16, 2012 at 2:42 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Anonymous...

    Sorry you're having voice trouble! Hydrate today big time. Do those easy exercises I've listed.

    Tomorrow, bring cans of Dole pineapple juice to mix with water and drink right before audition. The pineapple soothes throat tissues and makes them feel more hydrated. Try it out today if you can.

    I have a free 5 pg report with lots of other tips you can get by signing up to my newsletter (on my home paged).

    Good luck!

     
  • At November 26, 2012 at 4:26 PM , Anonymous Laura said...

    I keep loosing my voice, for the last 5 yrs..around this time of the year. I currently have had no voice..no sound, nothing for the last 3 weeks..acid reflux,allegeies, and sinus problems. WHEN will I ever get my voice back? Just finishing up with med's from doc. ..He said it is Laryngitis...JUST want to talk!...I miss talking to my 9 year old daughter and husband..this time its really messing with our minds..HELP!

     
  • At November 26, 2012 at 5:09 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Laura, I feel for you... can't imagine the frustration you're going through. Actually I can:<

    Listen, just do as your doc suggests, especially the voice rest. I always also recommend trying to get at the core of your seasonal issues. I'd research everything; usually an integrative approach works best with both mainstream medical docs and alternative health practitioners. The bottom line is, find out the cause of the mucous and inflammation this season seems to cause you.

    And don't rush your healing. You'll lose your voice longer if you try to get it back when it's still inflamed. Breathe. Whew!

     
  • At November 30, 2012 at 12:47 PM , Anonymous CHK said...

    hi Judy -

    Vocalist here who has a wedding gig tomorrow night. I had what seemed to be a mild cold/virus that started on around 11/11/12. Stupidly went to a party on 11/17 that had a live band playing, drank some red wine and the next day my voice was shot. I have tried to stay quiet but I had to work and had relatives visiting over the holiday weekend. This week I've been quiet except some talking required for work (I work from home so there was not much). Today I tried some light vocalizing and on doing some scales, some top notes (C above middle C) just drop out. I've been drinking tons of tea, with honey/lemon (right now drinking fresh ginger tea) water, doing the Neti pot for the last several days, but I'm worried about doing this gig. Some of my tunes are real belters.

    I have three more gigs this month and wonder if I should just not do this one, get a sub, and rest up for the two gigs I have next weekend. I know you really can't tell me what to do. BTW, it doesn't hurt to sing but I don't want to push it for fear of causing further damage. I plan to stay silent tonight and tomorrow as much as possible.

    It's Friday afternoon and I just don't think I can get to see a doctor and I'm not sure what they would do anyway (also would have to pay out of pocket). I have had laryngitis in the past and usually recover within a couple of weeks but I'm getting up there in age (51). Thank you!

     
  • At November 30, 2012 at 4:20 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi CHK...

    You know, if it's possible I always er on the side of 'if in doubt, sit it out'.

    Do be very careful not to come back full steam... warm up gradually and sing a little more each day as long as it feels good.

     
  • At December 8, 2012 at 11:24 AM , Blogger Ashley Bjaaland said...

    Hi Judy,

    I caught a cold 4 days ago & my symptoms have started to clear but now I have a what seems to be laryngitis. I had a dress rehearsal last night where I had to sing & continually coughed throughout the rehearsal. I woke up this morning with a speaking voice but absolutely no singing voice & my throat is tight & scratchy. I sing soprano & have 3 performances tomorrow & I'm FREAKING out! I have left over prednisone from a previous infection so I have considered taking that because I'm desperate to sing tomorrow morning! I'm resting my voice today & using a plethora of herbal remedies. Any suggestions or miracles to get me through my show tomorrow would be much appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Ashley

     
  • At December 8, 2012 at 11:49 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Ashley...

    If you HAVE to sing soon,GO TO THE DOCTOR TODAY! Ask about the prednisone or another kind of steroid inhaler, which can shrink the vocal cords temporarily ... for ONE concert. Not sure it will work for all three. If you do sing with laryngitis (even with steroid help), you can figure on setting your voice back for days if not weeks.

    Do the other things I suggest in this article, including having diluted pineapple juice to drink during your performance.

    I'm so sorry you're having this trouble. Sometimes you just have to cancel, sometimes you are just going to have to go through the process of getting well, and try not to damage your already compromised voice. Bless you, I feel for you.

     
  • At December 8, 2012 at 1:31 PM , Blogger Ashley Bjaaland said...

    Thank you! I will try the diluted pineapple juice. I just went to the DR & got the prednisone so hoping that helps for tomorrow. Early this morning i started an herbal product called Singer's Saving Grace Throat Spray & after 2 uses i already have less tightness & the hoarseness is gone! Recommending this to any singer... get this throat spray, its the real deal! I will definitely do all the things you recommended along with my herbal products & pray that will get me through! Ill report back hopefully with good news : )

     
  • At December 8, 2012 at 3:12 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Yes, please do, Ashley... this blog is all about what really works in the trenches... please let us know how you do and what affected your voice. Always open to learning ever more... xoxo

     
  • At December 9, 2012 at 3:53 AM , Blogger Vix said...

    Judy, I went to the E.R. yesterday morning after five days of thinking a "sore throat" would go away. The doctor prescribed antibiotics for ten days. My tonsils are swollen and said it was laryngitis. It hurts to talk and to swallow anything. I can't due to the pain I get from swallowing saliva as I attempt to sleep. I'm a singer and illness' like this worry me. Anything to alleviate the pain of swallowing? I haven't been able to eat or sleep well in the past five days and counting. I think what caused my case of laryngitis was having screamed horribly and woke up the next day with my throat sore. Was already experiencing feeling the need to clear my throat also. Help please. :)

    Victoria

     
  • At December 9, 2012 at 10:15 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Victoria; sounds like you are having a singer's nightmare. Glad you went to the doc and got some antibiotics. Yes, screaming can make a raw throat susceptible to pathogens floating by looking for an embed opportunity.

    I am not a doctor, please note that your docs advice is what you need to heed, but I'd confidently suggest a couple of things:

    Do go on voice rest. Don't sing, don't even talk if you can help it, til your infection has gone.

    For pain, try a gargle of 1/4 tsp salt and 1 tsp apple cider vinegar in a small glass of water. Warm or room temp is fine.

    Try using a neti pot before bed and getting up in the morning. You may find that it dilutes the irritating secretions going down the back of your throat and eases those tissues.

    My very best wishes for your speedy recovery, and until then, be wise and rest your voice til it's time to start working it back into shape, and you should be fine.

     
  • At December 9, 2012 at 12:39 PM , Blogger Vix said...

    Thank you Judy. I will attempt to gargle. Thank goodness for technology i.e. texting, e-mail and IM since my throat hurting I have become a mute. Lol.

    Thanks again,
    Victoria.

     
  • At January 7, 2013 at 9:29 PM , Blogger Susie said...

    Hello! OK, I'm no professional singer, but I have had training in the past. I sing with my church worship team, and in Dec came down with a bad cold that left my voice un-useable. I speak nearly normal at this point, but my singing voice is still raspy, and certainly not where it was :( Would your first suggestion be to seek out a vocal instructor to help me exercise? I actually know one, but just never thought to use her as a resource. Whenever I get laryngitis (once a year perhaps, usually at the start of winter) it lasts close to a month, so this never surprises me, but now that I am singing and using my voice for a purpose, it occurred to me I ought not to wait a full month... not to rush things either though.

    I'm reading things like don't talk, limit your voice usage, etc, but I'm a stay at home mother and I homeschool, so this is impossible for me to do. I'm certain I still have fluid in my chords (never occurred to me that was even possible til I read this!) because when I do sing or read a book, i do a lot of throat clearing. Having been on an antibiotic to prevent pneumonia (I'm currently pregnant, and 2 yrs ago I almost died form pneumonia-taking no chances) I'm fairly confident there is no infection. The homemade concoction suggested is great, I already made that for my cold, and it knocked out my sore throat in a day, so I'll make another batch.

    Thanks for the informative post!

     
  • At January 8, 2013 at 2:40 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Susie...

    Thanks for the wonderful comment! Congratulations about your pregnancy... my own son must have heard me sing a ton of jingles and radio IDs while he was in my belly; sounds like yours will be familiar with your voice quite early, too!

    Yes, I would advise you to connect with a good, insightful coach to help you get your voice all the way back. The form you use with your vocal exercise is as important as form with physical exercise.

    Alternately, you can always book a lesson with me by Skype or phone. Just leave another comment if you'd like for me to send you my contact info.

    Good luck, and thanks again for writing!

     
  • At January 16, 2013 at 4:08 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I've been pretty nervous because my voice is not recovered after having viral laryngitis about two weeks ago. I'm reassured to read the advice and comments here. I'll continue to take it easy and count on a full recovery over time.

     
  • At January 16, 2013 at 6:33 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Anonymous... yes, do take it easy and let your voice recover fully. If you get a chance, report back on how long it takes you... take care!

     
  • At January 17, 2013 at 2:30 PM , Anonymous Greiana said...

    I lost my voice about 4 weeks ago due to laryngitis for the first time ever! It was so horrible! But since it was during Christmas, I probably talked a bit more than I should have and drank a little too much Martinelli's instead of water :) Now it's been about 4 weeks and my speaking voice is normal, but I'm still having some problems singing in my higher range. It doesn't seem to be coming back as strong as before. Now of course I'm worried. Is this normal or should I seek out an ENT? I've never lost my voice before (I'm 27) so this whole ordeal is something new. I also teach and lead music for my church so I'm wondering if I should just take a few days and rest my voice? Thanks so much! Great blog and great advice for someone who is new to this experience!

     
  • At January 17, 2013 at 5:19 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Greiana.. glad most of your voice is back! Yes, when you experience some major inflammation in the vocal cords it can feel like forever getting it back in shape. That's why I wrote this post.

    Your inability to sing high is indeed a symptom that swelling is still there, however it is probably just from a lack of toning up. Imagine an arm muscle that stopped working out for a while. That muscle is flabby and can't do as much as it could. You carefully work it out again and as the muscle tone comes back, so does the ability. Same with your vocal cords.

    If however you begin easy vocal exercises, done with correct form, and your voice experiences strain or pain, stop and consider getting 'scoped' - best done by a specialized ENT at a voice clinic.

    Note that it's common to experience the 'helium effect' that I've mentioned in this post, but NOT pain - and your voice should feel better and stronger the next day. If not, you either exercised wrong or too strenuously, or your cords are still infected.

    So yes, take some voice rest, chill out and then get to work:)

     
  • At February 25, 2013 at 9:32 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy,

    I just signed up for your blog and was wondering how to get your 5 page report on vocal health. Thank you for all the tips, I lost my voice this weekend due to food poisoning (too much acid on my cords) and need to get back in the swing of things soon, as I am rehearsing a show that opens in a month.

    L

     
  • At February 25, 2013 at 9:56 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi;
    tThanks for signing up for this blog. To get the 5 page report, you sign up for my newsletter. If you like, just give me your email and I’ll do it for you, and when you click the link in your confirmation email you’ll get the report automatically.

    Food poisoning, eh?!! Ouch. Quick tips: Steam your throat (breathe deep in shower, over hot water bowl, etc), get your body more alkaline by eating lots of non-starchy fresh and steamed vegetables – also detox vegetable broth, do the neti pot to soothe throat tissues. No black tea… drink soothing herb teas, ginger tea. Possibly try the pineapple juice/water (about 25% pineapple juice to 75% water) and also put cayenne pepper on things you eat and in water with lemon. Cayenne pepper is a mucous membrane healer while black pepper is not.

    Good luck… sign up for the newsletter yourself from this website or send your email address to me at judy@judyrodman.com and I’ll do it for you.

     
  • At February 26, 2013 at 9:54 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi, Judy! I have a question about the laryngitis I've been going through. I caught the flu at the beginning of February that got pretty close to being pneumonia. Luckily, I went to a doctor before it got that bad, but about a week later I lose my voice. It got so bad that I started sounding like Wolf Man Jack or an old blues singer. This amused my friends and I greatly, and I spoke in that voice a lot more than was prudent. Now it's about two weeks later, and although my normal speaking voice is back, I still haven't gotten back my higher singing ranges or my falsetto. I'm concerned I may have done permanent damage to my throat, so my question is how long does it take for a voice to completely come back from a really bad case? If it doesn't come back by the end of the week, I'm seriously considering going back to see my doctor.

     
  • At February 27, 2013 at 1:19 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    If you can choose not to sing at all... or even speak much... in other words if you can go on voice rest for a week that would be great. Then carefully apply what I've suggested in this post. It may very well take 2 or 3 weeks to get your voice back fully. But if by a week it's not better, I would indeed go to a doc, and if possible, a voice clinic.

    One of the reddest flags pointing to vocal strain or damage that I know of is that of is not being able to make your head voice work. That means your vocal folds (cords) are swollen. If you are careful, and there is no active infection or fully formed nodes or polyps, you can often just gently work your voice out and reduce the swelling. Care is key. Let me know how it goes for you!

     
  • At March 12, 2013 at 9:45 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Thanks for the advice! It's been about a month now since I lost my voice, and my regular speaking voice has come back fully. There are still certain gaps in my range that I'm missing, and I can't do my falsetto at all, but they seem to be trying to come back, if only very slowly. I spoke to one of my theater professors, and he said he once lost his voice and it took almost 8 months for it to come back all the way! I hope it doesn't take that long, as I really love to sing and do funny voices. It sounds silly, but it makes life more fun. I did go see my doctor, and he gave me some pills for allergies (I had a lot of mucous buildup, though I don't think that was the problem). However, I recently went to see him due to a somewhat serious allergic reaction I was having to some skin-care product I was using, and he gave me some steroids that seem to be helping both the reaction and my voice, so fingers crossed I'll be back to normal soon!

     
  • At March 13, 2013 at 3:09 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Very happy to her you're better. If you continue to have trouble, do consider some vocal training. It shouldn't take 8 months for any voice to come back all the way!

     
  • At March 16, 2013 at 6:45 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy,
    I am a professional singer and have the biggest audition of my life on Mar. 28th. Today is the 16th. I developed laryngitis on Fri. Mar. 8th stemming from an upper respiratory infection. My speaking voice returned on Tues and Wed I carefully warmed up and did another big audition I had. Today is the first I have sung since. I feel a bit like I'm singing through a sock. Could this just still be the recouperating from the laryngitis?? I sang beautifully on Wed. I can sing scales up and down using my full range with no dysphonia, but when I'm trying to sing the actual music I feel this singing through a sock feeling. My cords feel a little fatigued after just singing 3 songs. Thoughts?? I'm using Roxalia, Manuka Honey, Throat Coat, lots of water and humidity. I'm starting to worry. Please let me know yours thoughts. Thanks so much!!!

     
  • At March 17, 2013 at 8:21 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Anonymous. OK here's the thing... if you're getting vocal fatigue after singing 3 songs something is wrong. Lots of times when we experience the fear that accompanies laryngitis for a singer, we assume unknowingly a guarded stance, which tightens the throat and compromises breath control and often moves articulation too far towards the jaw. Things just don't work right. This guarding behavior can be quite subtle. A tightening of the upper cheekbones (squinting), shoulders, tongue, neck, ribcage, spine. I experienced this first hand many years ago and it took a professional coach to rid me of it.

    If you can, touch base with your vocal coach to get to the core of the problems you're having. (If you'd like to do a lesson with me, contact me at judy@judyrodman.com) Or, if you financially can't swing even one lesson, try and check yourself for stiff, tight or otherwise guarded behavior when you sing. Pull, don't push your voice, get your power coming from the pelvic floor instead of your ribcage. Keep up with the hydration and let me know what you find helpful and how you fare!

     
  • At March 30, 2013 at 4:24 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy, I have always loved singing and for the last 30 years have mainly done choral, classical singing as well as playing the sax and clarinet. I am now attempting to sing more modern/pop music with a friend. I have been finding the transition hard but was doing well up until a few weeks ago. Suddenly I started to sound more "choral" again and my throat was painful after rehearsals despite being careful. I also found I was clearing my throat more. I saw my Gp a few days ago after a really bad rehearsal where my ears also felt strange. He examined my throat and ears and diagnosed viral laryngitis, telling me to stop singing and playing sax/clarinet. I asked for how long and he just said till I feel better and gave me an inhaler and ibuprofen to bring the swelling down. I dont have a sore throat or hoarse voice but do feel completely wiped out. How am I supposed to work out when to try singing again without the "classic" laryngitis symptoms?

     
  • At March 30, 2013 at 8:51 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi... well, what you are describing is a classic need for a vocal coach:) Really; you've got a loaded situation here because you're probably 'guarding' to keep from hurting your throat.

    DO NOT try to do vocal exercise, sing or even talk much when you are feeling wiped out. You just will NOT be able to control your air pressure and you will end up inevitably over-blowing your vocal cords. Have patience; wait til you feel your physical stamina is back. It's hard enough to do what you already know how to do, much less try to learn something new when your stamina is sub par.

    When you do start back, re-read this blogpost and you may find some help to keep you safe as you build your voice back. And do consider getting a vocal coach to help you change your style from classical to contemporary. There are lots of issues that need navigation there. Good luck!

     
  • At April 5, 2013 at 11:50 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hello again, I was the guy who was sick with the flu and lost his voice. My falsetto is coming back now in bits and pieces. I can hit some of my higher notes, but my low notes still cut out, and overall it's just not as strong or consistent as it used to be. I've described it as a "goose going through puberty." I was wondering if I should try to exercise my falsetto or let it rest, and if this seems normal for a recovery. I'm very pleased it's coming back, but I'm still a little worried that it may never come back all the way. And unfortunately, I lost my job recently so a trip to an ENT doctor is a luxury I can't afford at the moment.

     
  • At April 14, 2013 at 11:48 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi I am a cantor (music songleader for my church) and I have to cantor this weekend. I got sick with sinus infection about one month ago and now I can only sing in my very low range.I am a Soprano one and I have none of those notes. I have been struggling with the loss of my voice for about one month now. I am getting so worried about it as I enjoy my ministry and have been singing my entire life. Do you think that this could be laryngitis or could this be more serious? I really cant afford to go to a bunch of specialists to figure out what the problem is. Is there any natural remedies I can use to get my voice back? I can sing but it is very breathy and my high range of my voice cuts in and out constantly. When I speak I am a little hoarse but I talk just fine. I know that there is no quick solution but can you suggest somethings that I can do to aid my voice coming back. thank you so much!

     
  • At April 15, 2013 at 10:13 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Anonymous... very sorry you're having vocal trouble. I know how it feels to have singing be a huge part of my life and lose my voice for a long time. But I did get it back, and I'm sure you can, too.

    I am not a doctor, and here's the thing... any chronic, longstanding laryngitis should really be evaluated by not a bunch of specialists but one good ENT doc to rule out cancer. If I were you, I would do that.

    Breathiness and lack of upper register as well as some speaking hoarseness does indeed indicate swelling of your cords, and possibly nodules or polyps. This can be dealt with, usually without surgery, with voice rest and then vocal rehabilitation using vocal exercise as I described in this post... performed with good form only!

    So... my advice is to get assessed by a doc (a voice specialist if you can). You can start your voice rest today... get a pad and writing tool and tell everyone you are on voice rest unless an emergency calls for you to speak. Then your doc should advise you from there. Whatever you do, don't let this go on much longer without a medical assessment.

    Blessings and may you discover the root of the problem is slight!

     
  • At April 18, 2013 at 3:57 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy,

    thank you so much for your tips, you made me feel much better with your post.
    I'm a singer and I have recently worked really hard (4 hours a day) as I'm aiming to finish an album soon. What I should not have done is singing notes which are too high for my range and also singing too much. I felt that I was stressing my throat and vocal folds but I didn't imagine that i would have suddenly had laryngitis. My voice got worse and worse till last Monday, I could not talk anymore otherwise I felt a really big pain in my throat. Two days after I went to an ENT and he said I have laryngitis and I need to rest my voice and take antibiotics for 5 days. He didn't check my vocal folds I think, so I will definitely go and check them next week with another more specialized ENT. Today is my second day of antibiotics and 4th day with laryngitis, but I still feel that my vocal folds/throat are swollen, although definitely less than before, but i just can't even talk because it still feels painful. I'm really scared as singing is absolutely everything for me and sometimes I feel depressed and useless as I can't work on my project or even sing for fun a song that i like. Sometimes I'm scared that I will not be able to sing anymore, but I know it's all in my mind and I just need to be patient. I'm also drinking lot of tea, doing inhalation with boiling water and try to drink as much as possible. I did read the comments and I know you have already said something about it, but how long would you say i must wait before even my natural voice comes back and then start to sing again as I have always done? I have never had laryngitis and I'm really scared so I'm aiming to get a singing teacher/vocal coach as soon as possible to help me keep doing the right exercises. I thank you in advance for your help and your precious advice.

     
  • At April 25, 2013 at 3:38 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judi, I feel that every time I try to sing my throat muscles become tight again and I can't really sing high notes. My ENT said that everything is ok, my vocal folds look good and the only problem is that I should see a vocal coach to make sure that I don't stress my throat muscles too much when singing.
    I wonder how long the tension in the throat muscles lasts for and if it will disappear practicing? Should I wait more than 2 weeks before starting to sing again?

     
  • At April 25, 2013 at 8:24 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    It sounds like you need to get with a good vocal coach. If your vocal folds are fine and you correct your tension-causing vocal technique, tension in your throat muscles can disappear instantly, at least for the time you're singing the new way. Retraining involves developing the muscle memory of the new technique. It's the old habits that would create tension again.

    As for how long you should wait... I'd say get some re-training in before you sing at all. Even one hour with a good coach should illuminate the source of your tension. If you can't afford to do that, look into some good training materials you can purchase online or keep reading blogs like this one. Good luck!

     
  • At April 25, 2013 at 8:32 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Anonymous... I actually responded to your last comment; I missed reading the prior one where you mentioned how your vocal strain began. But what I said is still applicable to your situation. I feel for you; I deeply understand what it is like for someone who loves to sing to develop chronic tension that sabotages vocal ability. Don't be afraid... it really sounds like you just need to be careful, get some good training and slowly but surely work your voice up again. In my own case, I lost an octave and a half from an endotracheal tube. With professional vocal coaching, It took some time but I got it all back and then some. Take care and thank you for your comments here.

     
  • At April 26, 2013 at 11:47 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    hello judy. i was ill 4 weeks ago lost my voice had the worsed headache i have ever had phlegm stuck to back of my throat that felt like my throat was wearing a coat and sore throat. went doctor he gave me amoxacillian for 5 days. i got better but my throat was croaky still 2 weeks on. i then got drunk on the saaturday smoked ciggs and woke up next day with less of a voice. i then went to football match on the sunday and tried to keep quite untill my team scored last kick of th game and i cudnt contain myself. i woke up monday morning struggling to put a sentncce together. i have had a couple of arguments with misses this week and talk none stop to tennants whose houses i work in, my voice has got worse through out the week and after massive argument last night i can not get a word out. i dont want to sound stupid but if i keep raising my voice will it not get better or shud it got slightly better over the week. very worried due to cancer info all over net am 30 years old and male. thankyu in advance

     
  • At April 26, 2013 at 12:23 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi there Anonymous...
    Hey man, read your comment back to yourself and you'll surely get several clues as to why you've lost your voice! Actually, I'm sure that's why you told me this amazing story of vocal abuse... you're quite aware of it, haha...

    Here's the thing; cancer can begin in a chronically irritated area. You really have to listen to your own wisdom here and stop abusing your vocal cords. Did you know they are only about 3/4" long? I would imagine they are red, swollen and here's a fun fact... you can develop blood blisters which are the beginnings of vocal nodules from just 20 minutes of screaming.

    Also, if you get serious about quitting smoking, I have a great book for you... http://blog.judyrodman.com/2012/10/singers-and-speakers-want-to-quit.html

    In the mean time, please take care and go on at least a bit of voice rest. Take deep breaths, do more listening than speaking and let me know how you fare!

     
  • At April 26, 2013 at 12:35 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    thankyou judy. my name is ste i couldnt seem to get a post unless i clicked annomonous. i never experienced aanything so frustrating as this and god its so hard to not talk. i no shouting is not maaking it the situation any better but i thought my voice would of slightly came back after a week speaaking or not. i am not going to speak all weekend and see if things get a little better. again thank you for your time very much appreciated

     
  • At April 26, 2013 at 12:39 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    You are most welcome; and please remember... if it does not come back after another week or so, DO GET YOURSELF TO A DOCTOR. At least rule out anything serious.

     
  • At May 6, 2013 at 10:11 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hey Judy! Quick question. Have you found the best way to get rid of phlegm that seems to attach itself to the vocal cords? I have my methods of sleeping with a humidifier and taking hot showers to loosen it up, but have you found a brand of tea that works well? Or over the counter medicine like mucinex perhaps? Also in regards to allergies I've moved to a new location where I seem to be allergic to every thing that blooms! I always feel fine other than the fact they make me completely lose my singing voice for a week or more. What would you recommend to deal with consistent voice irritating allergies?

     
  • At May 6, 2013 at 6:11 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Great question...There is, as you probably know, no one-size-fits-all solution. There are many things you can try that may help you with allergies, and you may have to experiment to find things that do it for you. I addressed it briefly in my newsletter that just came out, and I'm going to do my next blogpost on this very subject... allergies! Look for it in a couple of days.

     
  • At May 8, 2013 at 2:06 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi,
    Well. Im am Playing the Lead In Dreamgirls. We have our first audience thursday night. My voice is strained from rehearsal, then I got food poisoning and was sick all night. Woke up and my singing voice and range was gone. It has slowly been coming back day by day, but I need to sing full out as of thursday night. The material im singing is all High Belt. Im thinking about Prednisone is get me through till my day off monday, Thoughts? I dont have an understudy and cant cancel. Thanks.

    Auri

     
  • At May 9, 2013 at 11:21 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Auri...

    Oh girl I am so sorry for your vocal trouble. Also, I've been on the road this week so am late getting back to you. You do indeed need to go to a doctor. It's possible that steroids may be your solution, hopefully you are talking to a doc as we speak.

    The important thing is to learn how NOT to strain your voice in rehearsal! You need to back off your pressure big time, and use the power of resonation instead of pressure belt. You can pull (instead of push) so strongly that even metal rock singers can sing without strain, whether in rehearsal or performance.

    I'm heading out right now, in fact, to attend an artist's rehearsal to make sure he doesn't strain his voice for his show tomorrow. Please let me know how you do.

     
  • At May 9, 2013 at 11:24 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    PS, Auri...

    Be sure and ask your doc about the after-effects of the steroid if indeed you go that route for your show tonight. The thing is, you need some serious voice rest afterwards, and you need to be as careful as you can not to abuse your cords under the influence of the meds. Water, water, water... take pineapple juice with you (a can of Dole's is fine) and mix it with water to drink whenever you get a moment in performance.

    Again... good luck!

     
  • At June 5, 2013 at 7:22 AM , Blogger The Artsy Chameleon said...

    Hi, Judy!
    I went through some kind of a laryngitis two weeks ago. Unfortunately, I self-diagnosed myself, because I wasn't able to visit a doctor. I think I'm right, though, because I had something which started as a common "sore throat" - pains when swallowing, and then it developed into 'almost losing my voice' situation. I had two presentations to make, and it seemed I was okay, but when I was done, the following days my voice was very hoarse and it was evident this was not the common cold or flu.
    Anyways, now I have restored my speaking voice, but I'm shying away from singing too much. Only songs in my total comfort zone. However, I was listening to Karma Hotel, the Spooks' song :) today, and I wanted to sing. It's pretty comfortable for me, but... at the beginning, there are some high parts in soft head voice (Welcome... to the... karma.. aaa aa). And I wasn't able to sing them at all! There was only breath coming out! And I very well know this is in my usual range! I became very scared; it;s as if something prevents me from singing, like my range just stops there. I thought there's been enough time since my infection cleared out...
    Do you think it might need even more time?
    Other than that, my middle and lower ranges are fine.

     
  • At June 5, 2013 at 8:21 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Artsy...

    I am not a doctor, but I know that your symptoms of breathy and missing higher range is cause to check for nodules. Chronic hoarseness also needs to be investigated to rule out throat cancer.

    I would urge you to get checked out by an ENT doctor. You can put yourself on voice rest (not making vocal sounds; not even speaking unless absolutely necessary, and then in clear, unbreathy bell-like tones, - no whispering at all) for a week or two and see if your voice improves. But if it doesn't, you really need to see a doctor.

    Also, when you begin to use your voice normally, consider getting some vocal training to help you get pressure off your vocal cords. My best wishes for your voice's speedy return!

     
  • At June 6, 2013 at 12:42 AM , Blogger The Artsy Chameleon said...

    Thank you, Judy! I'll get checked, for sure :)

     
  • At June 9, 2013 at 3:50 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy,

    I sing in a local choir for years and traching full time public speaking classes at a community college. My voice has always been fine, though somewhat thin ( not a lead) ..but I have always had a powerful speaking voice (low) with tremendous projection. Woke up with sore throat 2.5 weeks ago which progressed into voice and itchy dry cough. Had to work throughout, so some strain week one, then tried use microphone last week. Now, the virus seems clear, but sore throat persists, as does itchy dry cough. My voice tones are back....but when I use my voice it hurts, aches, and I can not project..or if I try I will pay for it. My voice or voice muscles seem sore, and not strong...itchy, achy, sensitive to air..talking..etc. I had multiple cultures during the bug, and all negative. I'm scared to death Inhave some kind of neurogenic damage the branch of the vagus nerve that is in the throat, and that I now have residual chronic pain from the virus. I have not taken any antibiotics or steriods. How long can this kind of voice weakness, itchy throat, vocal use pain last after a bad throat virus? Thank you!

     
  • At June 13, 2013 at 9:57 PM , Blogger dk said...

    I am in the same boat as "Anonymous" above. My problem also seems to be viral, or even an allergic reaction (to what? I don't know, and have never had any allergies.) After a few days I went back to work (nursing) and forced myself to talk in report, etc. I didn't know whispering was bad, I just knew I was extremely tired from trying to talk. So now it is a full four weeks, and my voice is just starting to come back...no high register, though. I have an antibiotic from the doctor if I get worse, but I feel it is just a nasty virus. I am taking an antihistamine and flonase, and lots of fluids. Thanks for this great site, Judy. I only sing in the car, but you are the true laryngitis expert.

     
  • At June 14, 2013 at 10:11 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Anonymous ... rather than a rare issue of vagus nerve damage (which is a new one on me) I would have a sneaking suspicion your voice weakness and pain has to do with your itchy throat-dry cough. My old vocal coach Gerald Arthur used to advise me not even to clear my throat unless I just drowning and then to clear it very carefully. As to how long your vocal problems can last? Definitely a bit longer than your cough. My advice is to get to the bottom of what's causing THAT. Could be some chronic drainage from your sinuses, I don't know. Remember I am not a doctor; I can just point you in some directions to look:) My very best wishes to you.

     
  • At June 14, 2013 at 10:24 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi dk...

    Very kind of you to say I'm an expert in laryngitis... but then if I was truly the expert I would nip it in the bud for everyone:) This singer's plague is tricky, and individual as to causes and cures. As to a possible allergic reaction... you and I can develop allergies we've never had, you know. Lovely fact:< In your case, a telling clue is that talking tires you. My suggestions 1. no whispering! Stop doing any breathy production of your voice. 2. No pushing! Use a little air as possible to make vocal sound.

    A good practice is to do tongue tanglers such as the ones you find in this post about the tongue http://blog.judyrodman.com/2011/05/tongue-tips-for-singing-and-speaking.html . Do these tongue tanglers with your hand in front of your mouth; pretend your hand is a glass pane and try not to leave a breath mark on it.

    Here is a video I made with some really vital tips on saving your speaking voice http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkdJqnKGT4I Please let me know what you find helpful as you try these things. As to how long laryngitis can last... when I didn't know what I know and pushed my voice through some sessions with active laryngitis, I sabotoged my singing for three and four weeks at a time. Maybe that's where some of my expert status comes from... in what NOT to do!

    My very best wishes for your speedy recovery. Please report back about what helps!

     
  • At June 19, 2013 at 11:01 AM , Blogger dk said...

    Dear Judy, I tried the tongue tanglers last night, and it is crazy how something so simple can help, but it has! Took allegra and my steroid nasal spray, and today picked up "throat coat" tea at Food Lion. It is four weeks today since I lost my voice, and today I have a voice, although it is still tending to be two timbres, unless I make an effort to have it be clear, riding on the breath, if that makes sense. I hate taking medications, but I know that this was caused by a viral infection and forced coughing to try to clear my throat. Never again! I had no idea that the vocal chords could be damaged by a forceful cough. I will continue following the advice you have given and let you know when I feel 100% back in voice. Thank you!

     
  • At June 19, 2013 at 11:41 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    SO very happy to hear of your recovery, dk!! Thanks very much for the report... it's so good to hear about results of trying things that work (and things that don't). I'd love to hear from others about your progress in healing. Thx again!

     
  • At June 22, 2013 at 4:01 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi there, ive got a could and starter yo lose my Voice heaters su and now is 100% gone. I'm leading a seminar in 6 days and I need to talk for 2 hours straight and I'm panicking about not having my voice back by then. Apart from rest and honey drinks what else can I do and how long until I get my voice back?? Thanks

     
  • At June 30, 2013 at 7:30 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy
    Last week I was screaming at the football and now my falsett I is just air and a sqeak
    I got through 2 gigs but it was horrid as I sounded like a croaky frog, will mt voice get better as I can sing 3 gigs a week usually and sing quite high with out issue
    But screaming over 25000 people doesnt work

     
  • At July 1, 2013 at 6:31 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    My voice was beginning to return after 2 weeks. I spoke a few times in a low voice and it left again. What do I do now? Any suggestions? Its difficult ignoring my 4 year old.

     
  • At July 1, 2013 at 8:21 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Here are my suggestions for you...
    1. Still speak as sparingly as possible. Oh my, I can imagine the confusion of your little one!
    2. Learn how to use as little air pressure possible when you do speak.
    3. Speak without pushing (low volume) but actually speak in a higher register with bell-like, NON-BREATHY tones. Play with making silly slurring sounds in your head voice. This will be fun for your 4 year old!
    4. Check with a doc if it persists, to rule out any damage.
    5. Do try the things I describe in this post.

    Let us know how you fare!

     
  • At July 1, 2013 at 7:18 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi judy , my voice will not say ahhh or uhhh in falsetto but will say eee and ooooh
    Whats happened , I did have a chesty cold
    Also my mixed voice is sqeaky now
    Hope it returns

     
  • At July 2, 2013 at 9:06 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    I hope some of the tips you read here will help your voice recover! Just take care and try not to force it to work and it should come back fine.

     
  • At July 2, 2013 at 6:04 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi,
    I am just getting over mono, and I had very swollen glands but the swelling seems to have gone down considerably; however, I still can't sing well at all. I can't hit high notes or low notes and my voice cracks at random. I am supposed to sing at my church this weekend and my cousin's wedding in a month and I am afraid I sound terrible. Any tips?

     
  • At July 2, 2013 at 7:05 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Anonymous... Other than what I've already written here, I really think you need to find yourself a vocal coach, get assessed and start working your voice out with specific exercises to your issues.

     
  • At July 13, 2013 at 11:11 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I got bronchitis 3 weeks ago and my voice hasn't been the same since. I'm still coughing every morning and night, although the infection seems to mostly be gone, and my voice feels like its betraying me. Where once I had a bright, loud, beautiful baritenor, and a loud and clear falsetto . . . I have hardly any qualities of a good singer anymore. I sound more like someone who sings along to his faveorite songs, than someone who actually has their own voice. I'm very upset about the whole thing.

    I plan on seeing a doctor to look at my throat, and getting some vocal lessons to see if I cant get my voice back. I never thought I'd be this sad, but it's truly awful. My voice was part of my identity and I feel like I've lost a part of myself. My G4, A4, and B4 have no magic in them, and my headvoice sounds weak and tired.

     
  • At July 13, 2013 at 7:27 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear anonymous...it's the coughing! I truly believe that when you quit coughing completely (maybe a few days AFTER you no longer cough) you will notice that your voice starts coming along. Coughing is what does my voice in. Do go to the doc, and do get some lessons. Good plan... but don't be afraid. Take care of the core issued (bronchitis, coughing) and trust the process of your vocal recovery! I know... I got my voice back and then some, after losing 1 & 1/2 octaves from endotracheal tube damage. That's worse than any cough could do. Be patient, and be happy!

     
  • At July 15, 2013 at 1:50 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Judy thank you for your reply! I will try to be more positive. It's so distressing to lose your voice. I've never lost it for 3 weeks before. I've lost 3 notes and my false. I couldn't imagine losing 1.5 octaves ... I'm glad you are recovered. Again thank you for your reply.

     
  • At July 15, 2013 at 6:23 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    :) You are most welcome... let me know how your healing progresses!

     
  • At July 24, 2013 at 11:58 PM , Blogger dk said...

    Dear Judy, well, I am still not at full voice and it is three months since my viral bronchitis. I did go to Duke Voice Care Center and was scoped - and have two small bumps on the chords -right across from each other. The scope was not difficult at all (much easier than I imagined!) and I have quit caffeine, increased water and am resting my voice more. I am going to go for voice therapy, as well. Judy, why does it take so long to get my voice back? Will I get back MY voice? I sound like Keith Richards, and I cannot sing any of my beloved Joni Mitchell songs. I never realized how depressing it must be for professionals to lose their voices. I now see how many "un-useful" words I have said. I will now appreciate the voice I took so much for granted before this all happened. I am encouraged to hear that you got your voice back in spite of ETT damage. Every morning when I wake up, I hope my voice is magically back, but it isn't. It is tiring to talk. I appreciate all of your work on Vocal Chords, Judy. Just wanted to update you. Blessings, dk.

     
  • At July 25, 2013 at 3:30 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear dk..
    Congratulations! You found out the cause of your 'Keith Richards' sound! That's terrific, now it's not a mystery. Truly, this is good news - be encouraged. And here's the thing, when you have actual organic vocal damage (like I did as well) it takes more time to heal. But you should indeed get YOUR voice back... and possibly be able to sing better than you ever have. Do indeed keep doing what the docs suggest. All the things you mentioned... hydrate, voice rest, careful vocal exercise with correct vocal technique... excellent healing advice.

    I was told I probably had permanent scar tissue on my vocal cords. Two years later I was singing recording sessions again, two years after that I signed a record deal and had a #1 record. If you take good care now, your voice should come back to you, and you'll be better off for this experience. I'd love to hear from you again in a month or two to see how you're doing!

     
  • At September 2, 2013 at 6:31 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi,
    I'm a 16 year old singer and I recently lost my voice cheering at a football game and i over sang the next day. Now my voice is back and i can speak for the most part and sing in my lower range but everytime I try to sing in my higher range, all that comes out is air. Do i have permanent vocal damage? is it too soon to tell? it's only been about 3 days since i got my voice back. What do i do to sing those high notes again?

     
  • At September 2, 2013 at 9:33 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Anonymous... go to the doctor and get checked out if your voice doesn't come back soon. Other than that, there are lots of tips in this article and these comments. Good luck with your voice, and be careful. It only takes 20 minutes of screaming to develop blood blisters on your vocal cords. These go away with rest, but if you aren't careful, they can go on and create callous-like vocal nodes. Word to the wise.

     
  • At September 12, 2013 at 11:53 AM , Anonymous Emma said...

    Hi Judy,
    I'm 14 and have been out of school the entire week. I went to the doctor on Monday with what I thought was a bad sinus infection and they gave me some antibiotics, but after not getting any better I decided to go back yesterday and they told me I have some sort of croup/laryngitis thing going on. I can talk but I'm really hoarse and as far as singing goes my voice is pretty much gone. They gave me Prednisone but I'm still insanely worried. I'm supposed to be singing this Saturday and I have another event on the 28th. I just don't really know what to do besides drink fluids and try not to talk. Do you have any advice?

     
  • At September 12, 2013 at 12:33 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Emma...

    So sorry you're having this trouble. The issue is of course the croupy coughing. That is so stressful for your vocal cords, and you should do everything you can to ease that cough. Try the pineapple juice when you try and sing.

    It may be the better part of wisdom to cancel your performance this Saturday. When you sing on a bit of laryngitis, you may be able to get through that performance but it will set your complete vocal cord healing back, sometimes be weeks or a couple of months. Yes, silence is golden for you. Heed all the stuff in this post. Please comment back as your healing progresses and tell us how you are. And don't worry about cancelling a gig. Check your pulse, you are human, and even major artist humans have to cancel due to illness or laryngitis!

     
  • At September 13, 2013 at 9:52 AM , Anonymous Emma said...

    Judy,
    Thanks so much for the quick response! I don't have any pineapple juice but I did try a cup of throat coat tea last night and it seems to be helping quite a bit. I'm going to keep drinking it throughout the day. I'm definitely starting to notice some improvement, especially with the cough, but I doubt I'll sing tomorrow unless this tea stuff is really a miracle. :)

     
  • At September 20, 2013 at 4:16 AM , Blogger ujjawal singh said...

    Hi judy
    I have never written yo ne 1 before...I had this throat viral thing a 2 weeks bfre whr I lost my voice...I have a high barritone voice ...very heavy...bt I took antibiotics a week later I gof my voice back bt with the helium effect...m starting my career bg this helium effct is like very frequent with me...I got scipe dne doc is ts normal....ts like hell without my voice I sing prac 24 hrs...I usd to have a strong voice...cnt wait to recover if u can help me speed up and tell me preventive measures....

     
  • At September 20, 2013 at 12:54 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Ujjawal... it sounds like you need some vocal re-training. You really need to find a vocal coach who can help you change the habits that keep straining and tiring your voice. Changing bad vocal technique into good is the only way to prevent vocal strain and to allow vocal irritation to heal. You may need to go on voice rest for a few days before you can even start any vocal exercises. The bottom line is that your voice should not hurt when you sound it. Get some lessons, either find a vocal coach locally or do lessons via Skype, to get to the cause(s) of your individual vocal dysfunction. I wish you speedy recovery!

     
  • At September 21, 2013 at 11:05 PM , Anonymous Jenny said...

    Thanks for this article, very informative!

    I'm looking for some advise to know if what I'm going through could possibly be vocal damage:
    I was trying to cover this Kelly Clarkson song, lost track of time and ended up practicing the hardest chorus for over 12 hours, pretty much non-stop. I was so focused on the task that I didn't even have water in between. When I finally noticed the time, vague warnings about nodules/polyps came to mind, so I stopped immediately. Tried to sing a soft song the next day and felt slight irritation, so decided to rest my folds. Other than trying a few sentences intermittently to see how my vocal folds are doing, I was mostly silent for a little over two weeks. Finally spoke a fair bit in the third week, resumed back to vocal rest because mt voice sounded a little strange. During this time, I read that too much vocal rest could lead to atrophy so been speaking a little since then but still find that my throat feels abrasive --no pain-- on the very first word out of my mouth. I seem to be able to speak for some time in my middle and high-ish range, but speaking in lower ranges seems to tire my throat even more quickly. Very worried now :S Appreciate any advise you might have for me. Thank you!

     
  • At September 24, 2013 at 7:53 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Jenny dear you really abused your voice. It doesn't take but about 20 minutes of screaming to produced blood blisters (the first signs of nodules) on the surfaces of your vocal cords. These can go away pretty quickly with vocal rest if you don't continue the abuse. However with 12 hours of singing a Clarkson chorus with not much water, I would highly recommend you get your throat scoped and examined by an ENT - who specializes in voices if possible. In the mean time, use your voice as little as possible, and don't whisper or make any breathy sounds. Don't worry about vocal cord atrophy... you can, when you know your vocal cords are well enough, work your vocal stamina back up gradually to where you were or even better.

    When you do start back, be sure and have water available; try sipping the diluted pineapple juice at your practice to keep your throat tissues soothed and hydrated.

    You obviously love to sing! Just take care of your instrument... work it smart, not hard. You should NEVER feel vocal strain when you are singing and speaking with good form. Let us know how it goes!

     
  • At October 21, 2013 at 9:18 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy,
    It all started 3 months ago. I had been pushing myself too hard, practicing songs that were too high or that hurt my throat to sing. Practicing everyday, at home, in the car and seemingly all the time in the hopes that someone from church would ask me to sing a solo. You see many years ago I use to sing solo's in the choir, at various churches, in weddings etc. but I lost confidence in myself when I would hear others that I thought sounded better than myself to the point I gave up and quit singing for a long period of time. Anyway, I joined the worship team at church a couple of years ago and my enthusiasm came back in hopes of getting a solo at church. (so I have been pushing myself hard for a couple of years now...which seems to have caught up with me) I noticed my throat would hurt when I would sing but I ignored the pain. I really had no idea the damage I was doing to myself. Lesson learned! and now I have been trying desperately for 3 months to get my voice back. Of course right after I first started having complications with my voice, someone FINALLY asked me to sing a solo...I could not contain my excitement that someone has finally asked me to sing. I could not bring myself to tell them "no" I am having voice trouble for fear that no one would ever ask me again. I told myself that I would rest my voice and by Wednesday when I had to sing my voice would be back, well my voice never came back and I ended up singing anyway, which was a mistake because I sounded horrible because my voice was breaking up a lot. I went to 2 ENT's who scoped me and told me that my vocal chords looked a little red and irritated and maybe they said swollen (I can't remember) but they did not mention anything about polyps or nodules or anything like that. In the meantime, I really starting trying to rest my voice as much as possible and would only sing at church on Wednesday's and Sunday's. It took 3 months but my voice finally seemingly started to bounce back a little bit, I could hit some high notes again and though it was still a strain on my voice it wasn't as bad as it was. However, I think the therapist gave me bad advise which was to start singing again everyday and to do vocal exercises. Last Sunday I started having noticeable problems again and my voice seemed seemingly gone and I could not hit the high notes at all again. I was back just like I was before. I am having to clear my throat a lot and I seemingly have lost control over my voice to get it to do what I want it to. Yes, you guessed it, prior to this someone had just asked me to sing a solo again and right after I committed to them to sing my voice completely breaks down again. So now what to do? I am scheduled to sing this Wednesday and I am scared if I cancel on them they or no one else will ever ask me to sing again. I have myself on complete voice rest until Wednesday. Should I call and ask my doctor if he would call me in some prednisone? as I noticed this seems to be what other people are doing. What would be your suggestion? thanks Darlene

     
  • At October 22, 2013 at 8:23 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Darlene... oh my gosh what pain and fear (not to mention doctors' bills and medication) you could avoid with some vocal training. It sounds like whenever you have the opportunity to sing, you push your voice too hard in preparation and you accumulate body tension in general because you're afraid. It won't do you any good to sing or do vocal exercises unless you know how to do them. Quite frankly I'd cancel your performance and get the training you need. In the end, it will cost you less and you will be able to sing!

     
  • At December 17, 2013 at 9:51 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hello Judy!
    So, I am a theatre student in university who does a great deal of singing, but a horrible cold took my voice completely out of commision about a month ago. I was reduced to nothing more the a quiet, occasional whisper for about three weeks, and now (with a great deal of water, tea with honey, and rest later, my speaking voice is back to normal, but my singing is much breathier, and prone to cracking while I sing. What should I do??
    Thanks, Alexis

     
  • At March 5, 2014 at 4:12 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hey judy

    so just recently ( the 8th of February actually) i finally learned how to open my throat and mouth when I sing. problem was I want a little crazy with it and ended up belting for two days and getting a itching throat. I instantly singing and vocal training thinking it would go away in a few days, but a few turned into several days so I got worried and went to the doctor on the 19th of February. He told me it probably was my allergies that was keeping my throat from healing and give me some stuff for it and told me not to sing and it would take seven to ten day for my throat to heal. Ten days passed on the 28th of February and my throat is still itchy and im getting kinda worried that I'll never beable to sing again I hope you can help

    also even doe I wasn't singing for the seven to ten days I was opening my throat/ mouth breathing as if I was about to sing and lip sync to my favorite songs so maybe that has something to do with it.

    thanks:)

     
  • At March 13, 2014 at 2:18 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hello judy this post was helpful I have a news interviw in less than 12 hours im a local singer and songwriter i have no voice at all.

     
  • At March 13, 2014 at 5:06 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Anonymous...
    I hope you feel better by now. Be sure to have that pineapple juice handy at your interview! Let us know how you do.

     
  • At May 8, 2014 at 12:11 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hey Judy, thx for posting this. I am only 15, and i am having a very bad throat infection (or whatever its called). And i am getting better. But i tried to sing today and i realized that i lost some of my high notes; its really scary! I am wondering is it possible to lose my high notes forever? Considering that my voice is still developing

     
  • At May 8, 2014 at 11:11 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Anonymous... If you read this whole post and the comments after it, you'll notice that healing from a throat infection is a process. As to losing your high notes forever... you'd have to create some serious vocal damage to do that. It might help you to read how I lost my voice and regained it: http://blog.judyrodman.com/2013/10/how-my-damaged-voice-came-back.html

     
  • At May 28, 2014 at 12:24 AM , Blogger Shelby Bosse said...

    Hi Judy! Just seeking some further advice- I completely lost my voice about a week and a half ago, and it feels like a very long recovery process. For about a week I've had a lingering, nagging cough, and experiencing what feels like post-nasal drip. I've been on vocal rest as much as possible, drink a lot of tea with honey and other liquids, and have cough drops to help with my cough. Being in a demanding musical production that opens next week, I would really like my full voice back (my lower register is fine, but my upper is very weak) and was wondering if you had any additional advice/ generic medicines to suggest. Thank you so much!

    -Shelby

     
  • At May 28, 2014 at 8:21 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    The cough is your big problem - especially for your head voice. I find that otc meds do little for this singer's nemesis as long as the mucous and irritation is there. Do try some kind of nasal douche (Neti pot,etc) to soothe the back of your throat and ease the cough reflex. And check your diet. For now eliminate absolutely anything that would be mucous forming, add alkalizing foods like celery, veg broth soups, green drinks, steamed veggies. Add ceyenne pepper to things you eat and drink. Fruit-protein smoothies should be fine in the A.M. Water water water. Use the very dilute pineapple juice when you're vocalizing and rehearsing. AND... I'm not a medical doc, do remember this is just my advice based on my personal experience and not a sub for a doc visit:)

     
  • At June 9, 2014 at 12:40 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hello. Im a singer. I lost my voice in march but I didnt stop singing I sang like that either way. I seem to sound fine in low low notes but my high pitched ones wont even come out im really scared i havent been able to sing the right way in like 4 months i need my voice back what can i do. did i injure a vocal cord?

     
  • At June 9, 2014 at 3:11 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Anonymous; of course I can't know if you injured your voice but to continue to sing after you've lost your voice is a lot like continuing to drive after your temperature light comes on:< If I were you, I'd go to a voice clinic and have yourself examined to find out what your situation is. Hopefully some of the things you read on this blogpost and comments can be of help. Good luck... and do be careful to to the bottom of your vocal issues.

     
  • At July 15, 2014 at 8:18 AM , Blogger Damian Wade said...

    Hi Judy I am a 39yr old male and just over a month ago I started to sing, only to find that I could not longer hit the notes I have always been able to hit. This is still the case and its freaking me out a little. I feel in good health and don't have a sore throat or sinus issues. Have you come across this before? I'm starting to get worried.
    Kindest regards,
    Damian

     
  • At July 15, 2014 at 10:52 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Damian... yes, it is quite normal not to have your full range if you've stopped singing for a period of time. It's like physical exercise with any muscle... lay off for a while and when you get back to it, you can't do what you could before. The answer is to slowly start to use your voice... WITH GOOD FORM!! The problem comes when fear causes a guarding behavior, which can sabotage breath control. If you'd like a lesson to assess your issues and get you started on the right track with your practice, let me know. Good luck!

     
  • At July 22, 2014 at 11:07 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy I have been having problems singing throughout the past couple days..... A few days ago I went to an amusement park and I screamed a lot... And ever since then I have not been able to sing no where near as high as I could I maybe lost an octave maybe 2 since then and I am worried that I'll never get it back.... I don't have any pain I just have to clear my throat a lot and sometimes towards the end of my sentences my voice will get a little raspy.... If there is a way to get this back please let me know...

     
  • At July 22, 2014 at 12:34 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Anonymous; if you read this whole string of post and comments, you'll get some good ideas as to what to do to get a hurt voice rehabilitated . But I am not a doctor; if you are in doubt about whether or not you've damaged your voice, get checked out by a medical professional. You could try complete voice rest for at least a week and then re-assess how your voice feels. If it still hurts, or chronic laryngitis seems to have set in, go to an ENT doctor and have your throat examined for any damage. You may have developed the beginnings of nodes, little blood blisters, between your vocal folds. This is most probably completely reversible with voice rest, corrective vocal training and possibly dietary changes and hydration, but do get checked out medically if it continues.

     
  • At August 23, 2014 at 5:10 PM , Anonymous lisa said...

    Hi Judy!

    I've read this list and think it's pretty amazing how you respond to everyone. What a gift of your knowledge. My story: I'm a singer/songwriter and singing is one of my greatest joys. I had bronchitus about five months ago which was exacerbated by allergies. I was put on antibiotics and steroids. I also am a teacher which involves lots of talking during the day. I've noticed changes in both my speaking and singing voice. My speaking voice is raspier, and although my singing voice is clear in higher and middle range, it is raspier (as if there's a sort of buzz) in the lower range. I'm concerned that this instance of bronchitus may have done irreparable damage to my voice (Also, over the past seven years that I've been teaching, I have probably had 2 to 3 instances of laryingitus that I have had to 'teach through'). I'm unsure of what to do next: maybe I should do more vocal warm ups? maybe I should go see an ENT to look at my vocal cords? I'd appreciate your feedback. Thank you! Lisa

     
  • At August 24, 2014 at 6:19 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Lisa; thank you for your kind words! OK, any chronic raspiness that you can't get out needs to be attended to. Yes, it's a great idea to get an ENT to check your cords - best to go to a voice clinic for a specialist. Yes, bad technique in your speaking voice can be a huge reason for limitations in your singing voice. Check out this video I did on "Saving Your Speaking Voice" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkdJqnKGT4I . Sounds like you could use some vocal re-training, too, with assessment of any technique you're using that is causing you problems. I wish you the very best, and hope that video does help. One other thing to know... you probably have NOT done irreparable damage to your voice.. but the sooner you stop doing that which is causing strain and fatigue, the better.

     
  • At September 11, 2014 at 8:59 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy, I really found your article helpful and interesting. I have had laryngitis(or what seemed to be laryngitis) for a little more than a week and my speaking voice seems normal now, but I still have a dry cough feeling in my throat and my voice seems to have that helium effect when I sing. One of the things I noticed during the one week period was blood in my mucous. Most of the blood has cleared out and now my mucous is the color brown. Am I healing, or did I start talking too early?

     
  • At September 12, 2014 at 1:18 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Dear Anonymous... whenever you have colored mucous you should get checked out by a doc. You might need antibiotics. Definitely if it continues, make an appointment. In the meantime, do take care not to use your voice too much, especially as long as the helium effect lasts when it's not due to a lot of singing. It means your cords are still inflamed. Patience! Talk as little as possible, with bell-like clear tone and no whispering!

     
  • At September 12, 2014 at 6:40 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I did go to urgent care and was prescribed the oral steroids. The doctor said it is what's normally given to opera singers. They said to get it filled if my condition continues for more than a few days (a little over a week ago). Hearing that it was steroids made me nervous to fill the prescription. I've seen countless sites that did not recommend the steroid and a few of your comments about them. Is it risky to go that path? Thanks so much for your input. I know it's been like 4 years since this article was posted. I am grateful for your time.

     
  • At September 13, 2014 at 9:28 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    I know it may seem like a cop out or glib reply on my part to give you a medical disclaimer, but the truth is, you really do need to take into consideration your physician's counsel for your condition. Then make your own decision.

    I will admit that for a very important gig many years ago I once took steroids for laryngitis - in my case they prescribed it in the form of an inhaler. I sang and got through the gig (barely) and then had to rest my voice. As I remember, it was at least three weeks before I started getting it back. Sometimes performers go for a quick fix if it's a gig emergency, but steroids should not be used as a long term vocal fix. If you do take them for a gig you absolutely don't think you can cancel, get to the bottom of the reason for your laryngitis. In my case, it was systemic... eating foods I didn't digest well which made me toxic and readily open to any upper respiratory bug that floated by.

    Remember that the best thing for active laryngitis is vocal rest. So instead of resorting to steroids, cancel your gig if possible til vocal cord inflammation subsides!

     
  • At September 22, 2014 at 2:29 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy i went to a festival and when i got back i got a chest infection and majorly lost my voice. ive just fnished my medication and feel alot better still have a dry cough and phlem but other than that alls ok. But im ashamed to say i did not rest my voice at all in this period and as soon as i got it back i started singing again. Most of my range is fine except my high notes and my whistle tones which just won't come out im worried that ive damged something, you know how self diognosis goes on google. Is it uncommon for this to happen? or do i just need a vocal rest? Thanks

     
  • At September 28, 2014 at 10:03 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy, I am really hoping you reply to me because I am freaking out right now... I am a singer and a voice teacher and I teach voice six days a week. As you can see already, I use my voice a lot and without it, I am lost... Recently, I began to notice a decline in my high notes, but I thought it was nothing serious because I am a soprano and a big fan of belting. I have properly trained my mix voice (being a voice teacher myself) and know how to use it without straining. I haven't done the best job at always warming up before I sing, but I never sang to the point where I felt any strain, pain or loss of notes. I have never lost my voice from singing. Then just the other day, I started losing notes in the middle of my registers. There is a rasp when I try to sing in falsetto and some notes are gone. I used to sing like a bird and even have whistle. I am freaking out and do not have health insurance so I can't see an ENT any time soon... I've been drinking ginger tea, water, throat coat, speaking as little as possible and sleeping as much as I can. It's been about a week and I am seriously depressed over this... I guess my question is - if I lost notes, is this temporary and can it be regained? I heard that loss of notes in the middle of scales are a sign of nodes, but I do not feel any pain... Today when I was teaching voice, I got very tired after about 5 hours and started feeling very vocally fatigued... What do you suggest? Please help, I am so depressed from this!!! My voice is everything to me! Thank you so much.

    -KK

     
  • At September 29, 2014 at 1:04 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hello Anonymous. I hear your frustration; I'm so sorry you're having this struggle. Again, please understand that I am not a doctor and even if I was, I couldn't diagnose you without seeing you. That said, my thoughts are:

    You say you are 'a big fan of belting'. You may be pushing too much chest voice, and your basic technique may not be as healthy as you think it is. Sometimes this catches up with a singer who used to get by with a degree of vocal cord stress and no longer can.

    You say you got 'very tired after 5 hours'... you may have some other physical ailment which has taken so much of your energy you haven't been adequately supporting your speaking and singing voice. It could be anything from chronic fatigue syndrome to fighting a virus, etc.

    You could have hormonal imbalance, which will really cause you to freak out and worry even more. Hormones affect the cords, as you may know.

    Suggestions: Read this whole post and comment thread for possible help. Check your diet, your technique, your mental, physical and psychological health. Go on a period voice rest as much as possible and when you do use your voice use bell-like, quiet tone.

    VERY IMPORTANT: If your voice doesn't get better, you HAVE to get checked out by a doctor. I don't want to scare anyone, but chronic laryngitis could be anything from GERD to cancer. Don't mess around with it. Let us know how you do.



     
  • At September 30, 2014 at 1:36 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy, thank you so much for your quick response! I will def pay attention to all the things you mentioned and read up on all the comments/the post you wrote about how you lost your own voice at own point. You're right -- I have been pretty intensely upset over the loss of notes and throwing little emotional fits to people in my life HAHA! And I prob do push a little too hard when I belt... As long as its not gone for good... I'll give it another week of extra rest, fluids, etc. and if its not better, ill try to find a way to see someone. Thank you so much for dedicating your time and energy to all of us! You are so kind, I really appreciate you <3

    -KK

     
  • At September 30, 2014 at 4:35 AM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    You are most welcome... and again, do let us know how you are doing... what works, what didn't, what you learned! xoxo

     
  • At October 22, 2014 at 2:13 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi Judy, can I ask you something. umm.... How many days will you're voice come back
    Thanks !! Pls. Respond :D ADVICE PLEASE !!

     
  • At October 22, 2014 at 6:25 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    It depends on what's wrong with it.

     
  • At November 1, 2014 at 12:36 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi, Judy! I don't think my last post went through, so I am trying again. I am a teacher (not a singer). I have lost my voice and have found your post to be very helpful. However, I have question that I do not see mentioned in the blog. I am unable to even hum at this point. I am guessing I should not attempt to speak until I am able to hum. Would this be a correct assumption? Thanks so much for your advice.

     
  • At November 1, 2014 at 5:45 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hi Anonymous... the answer is an unequivocal yes! If you can't even hum your poor vocal cords are swollen and do not need to be sounded. Give it a good rest! Hopefully you can write what you need to say to your students. Good luck with your speaking voice! Also, you might want to check this video out that I did specifically for voices of teachers... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkdJqnKGT4I

     
  • At November 2, 2014 at 11:09 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi, Judy! This is Sherri (the hum question).

    I want to say how much I appreciate the valuable info you provide here as well as your "being there" for me when I had a question. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am able to hum today, but not in a full range. I am guessing I should avoid talking until I can hum in a full range?

    Would this be correct?

    I watched your speaking voice video and found it helpful. I also attempted to say some tongue tanglers without feeling breath on my hand, but this made my throat hurt a bit.

    Here is my plan: (1) hum, hydrate, gargle, etc, (2) avoid speaking until I can hum in all ranges (is this being over careful?), (3) take a sick day from teaching tomorrow, continue with hydration/gargling and start with tongue tanglers plus use dilute pinapple juice as needed, (4) return to teaching on Tuesday continuing with the dilute pineapple juice.

    QUESTION: You mentioned two terms I did not understand: "bell voice" and "head voice." I was wondering if you might be able to explain these further or if you had a video with examples of these? I did see your comment above that said, "Learn how to use as little air pressure possible when you do speak and speak without pushing (low volume) but actually speak in a higher register with bell-like, NON-BREATHY tones."

    I am guessing this is the bell voice you mentioned, but I either don't understand it or am not yet able to do this. Is this what I would be doing with the tongue tanglers?

    p.s. My next goal is to figure out why I seem to have this problem every Oct. Guessing it is mild allergies, stress, lack of sleep, combined with a cold. When I felt symptoms coming on this year, I used Zyrtex allergy meds, which seemed to help, but now I am wondering if this dried my throat too much. When my symptoms became more cold like, my next step was to try Mucinex, but it did not prevent the Laryngitis/pharyngitis.

    Thank you again for your expert help. You are saint for listening to everyone's problems and offering assistance.

     
  • At November 2, 2014 at 12:01 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Yes, your assumptions are correct on these points with this exception: Don't try to habitually speak too high. Many people make this mistake. Just use all parts of your range - more musical, conversational and engaging vocal tone, instead of monotone. I do think it's a good idea to speak in your higher register (head voice) a lot while doing tongue tanglers, as good exercise for this less used part of your voice.

    It's good that you ask questions and want to dig a little deeper. If you'd like to take a lesson, let me know and I can personalize these instructions. Even 30 minutes can be quite helpful to you.

     
  • At November 4, 2014 at 8:02 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hi, Judy! Sherri again! Just a quick note to update you! Your tips worked great! In just 3 short days, I went from not even being able to hum to returning to my teaching voice. Today, I was able to talk all day long and project so my students could easily hear me! Yeah! Note: I am a bit more gravely sounding this evening than when I started out this morning!.

    I wanted to add that I especially love your pinapple juice (25%) plus water (75%) drink! I have a hard time consuming enough fluids.This blend not only tastes great, but also soothes my throat while keeping me hydrated!

    It is also great to know that you offer sessions online! I will definitely keep this in mind for the future.

    With much gratitude! =D

     
  • At November 4, 2014 at 11:46 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    You are so very welcome, D and thank you for taking the time to let me know what worked!

     
  • At November 6, 2014 at 12:03 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hello Judy,
    I just came across this post hoping that I can get some help. I have viral laryngitis and I am currently starring as Maria for my schools production of Westside Story. The opening night is in 4 weeks and I am stressing out. My Dr. told me not to talk at all for an entire week, but this also forced me to cancel my vocal lessons. Im scared that even when I am allowed to talk again, I wont be able to sing in my soprano range by the show.

    Best,
    Hannah

     
  • At November 6, 2014 at 12:27 PM , Blogger Judy Rodman said...

    Hannah... here's the thing... if you have actually been advised by a doc not to sing for a week, your laryngitis is significant, and you DON'T want to work those swollen cords. Let them heal, then get to your vocal exercising. If you're using correct form, you can make terrific progress in only a week. With swollen cords you've abused however, your soprano range could be out of reach. Relax and heal:)

     

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